Why Germany Nearly Won

Why Germany Nearly Won

A New History of the Second World War in Europe

Book - 2012
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ABC-CLIO

This book offers a unique perspective for understanding how and why the Second World War in Europe ended as it did—and why Germany, in attacking the Soviet Union, came far closer to winning the war than is often perceived.


This book offers a unique perspective for understanding how and why the Second World War in Europe ended as it did—and why Germany, in attacking the Soviet Union, came far closer to winning the war than is often perceived.


• Detailed maps show the position and movement of opposing forces during the key battles discussed in the book

• More than 30 charts, figures, and appendices, including detailed orders of battle, economic figures, and equipment comparisons



Book News
Most historical analysis takes it for granted that Germany was bound to lose the war because of military and economic reasons. In this work for historians and general readers, Mercatante, who holds a teaching certificate in history and political science, argues that Germany came closer to winning the war than has previously been recognized. He investigates the strengths that enabled Germany to last so long with powerful countries teamed against it, and shows how the invasion of the Soviet Union represented Germany's best opportunity for winning the war. The book includes numerous b&w maps. Mercatante is a tax attorney who also runs a website on WWII. Annotation ©2012 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Publisher: Santa Barbara, Calif. : Praeger, c2012
ISBN: 9780313395932
0313395934
9780313395925
0313395926
Branch Call Number: 940.5421 M534w
Characteristics: xviii, 408 p. : ill, maps ; 25 cm

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Nov 28, 2012

Why Germany Nearly Won: A New History of the Second World War in Europe --- by Steven D. Mercante. Mercante sets many of the rceived wisdoms about World War on its end: the Allies couldn’t help but trounce Germany on the beaches of Normandy because of a preponderance of weaponry; Germany was beaten in Russia by General Winter; the Russians were bound to overcome the Germans because they greatly outnumbered them. In a book that, depending on your degree of interest in the War will prove to b e either tedious and boring or insightful and meticulous. It is the kind of book that itemizes virtually every battle between Germany and the Allies; that tallies up the dead and wounded on both sides in every battle between Germany and the Allies; that adds up the number of tanks, anti- tank weapons and aircraft lost on both sides of the confrontations. The Battles are there: Stalingrad, Kursk, Berlin. The commanders are there: Zukhov, Rokossovsky and Chuikov; Rommel, Manstein and Halder. The tanks and their relative merits, their armour, the strength of their weaponry. It features much greater detail than what the history simply labels “the Eastern Front” or “Normandy”
And did Germany nearly win the war? Mercante keeps tabs of all the mistakes made by Germany: Hitler’s micro management of critical phases of the war; tanks that were obsolete as they were built; logistics problems that often paralyzed German Panzers at critical points; strategic errors that left critical oil reserves untouched while the German military persisted in attacking Stalingrad; repeated misallocation of resources by they of materiel or manpower. The list is long. However, let’s be thankful for all these errors. It would otherwise have become a much different world.

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